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Slackware vs. Arch Linux

I recently found an excellent article comparing Slackware and Arch Linux.

http://beej.us/blog/2009/12/arch-vs-slackware/

bye bye Ubuntu

I think I am going to scrub my Ubuntu 10.04 system (the one I am typing on is Linux Mint Debian), and do another Arch Linux install.   At that point Ubuntu will have been totally jettisoned.  For an Ubuntu done better than Ubuntu, I have Linux Mint.   LM is great for an easy productive installed Linux.  However, it is so easy that it does not do much for my need for a Linux “geek” fix.  So, that is what Arch is for.  Not an easy install.  I have to actually think, read, and learn to do stuff properly on it which is why I fell in love with Linux in the first place.

Don’t get me wrong, I am not an Ubuntu hater.  The Ubuntu team did some really great things and set some really high bars that I think had a great influence on the entire Linux world.  However, I think they have taken a wrong turn with their emphasis on the Unity desktop and have dumbed down the system far too much.  I do appreciate their reasoning for doing this in that they want to get as many newbies and hopeless end users onto Linux and expand the user base.  I really do applaud that and wish them all the best.  However, it is just not for me.  I am a hardcore geek.  I write code.  I do geek for a living and for pleasure.  I just need something more chanenging and interesting.  Fot me comptuing is not just a means to and end, it an end unto itself.   So, of to greener pastures.  I have done Arch before, and really like it.  Even when I got stumped a few times on how to do something, I really liked it.  Linux Mint for my everyday utilitarian computing and Arch for my geek needs.  That’s where I am at now, but given time all this too will change.  I love the ever changing Linux landscape.

–Bill

ArchLinux, install file compression packages

With a base install of ArchLinux completed, you may find you still do not have all the file compression utilities installed to handle most commpression types.  Run the following to install the most common file compression packages.   Some may already be installed.   This is ok, they will just be refreshed.

pacman -S tar gzip bzip2 zip unzip unrar p7zip arj lha lzma-utils lzop

Xfce 4.8 missing trashcan

If you install Xfce 4.8, you may find the desktop trashcan icon is missing, even though it is selected in the desktop properties visible icons selection.   To get the trashcan icon back, install the gvfs package.

ArchLinux Reviewed

The Linux Action Show guys review ArchLinux. The ArchLinux review is about 30 minutes into the show.

An ArchLinux DVD tweak

This is just a quick tweak for ArchLinux. Many apps, such as VLC Player, that need to read the DVD device default to a setting of /dev/dvd. I found that ArchLinux does not have the DVD device listed in the /dev directory as such. Instead they are using /dev/sr0. You have a couple of choices. Once you know this fact, you can adjust the configuration of every app you use that needs to read the DVD drive to look to /dev/sr0. In my opinion, it is more straight forward to adjust the ArchLinux system to accomodate the use of /dev/dvd by creating an entry for it. Put the following in your /etc/rc.local system startup script and everytime you start the system the /dev/dvd device entry will be created for you automatically.

cp -l /dev/sr0 /dev/dvd

Distro Review: ArchLinux

ArchLinux, when old becomes new again

There is an old saying about old things becoming new again.   That is what I thought about as I did an ArchLinux install for the first time this weekend.   The process took me way, way back into the ’90s when I first became involved with Linux.   Back then, it was Slackware and a pre version 1 kernel.   The process was boot from the disk and very carefully follow the directions.   No GUI install back then and you configured your system as you went.   When the install finished, you were were presented with a shell login prompt to logon as root.   Very much the same thing when doing an ArchLinux install today.   I chose to use the net install CD, which is only about 160MB in size, the rest of the distribution is pulled down from mirror sites on the Internet.   The main appeal, to me, was that it was a return to a more technical DIY type of install with every little detail under my control, as opposed to a GUI install that lets you choose the language, time zone and keyboard and all the rest is done for you.   Now, I am not at all complaining about the modern, easy, GUI Linux installs.   These are in fact WONDERFUL!   Without easy installs like these that very nearly garantee a successful install, Linux would have very little chance to spread and be as widely adopted as it is becoming.    However, sometimes us geeks need more.   We need to satisfy that urge to take a look under the hood and tinker.   Sometimes we just need to geek out and do it ‘the hard way’.   So, I jumped in and did an ArchLinux install to satisfy this need.   One thing that I found is that while is very much a lower level install, it is also a very structured and GOOD install process.   You encounter much more detail along the way, but the process is very tightly controlled.  It is also what I would consider a very educational install with the internals exposed to view.   However, one thing it is not is undocumented.   Back in the old days, the install was sparsely documented and you really had to hunt and search to find out what you need to know to get everything right and running.  The documentation on the ArchLinux site, and also provided on the install CD itself, is supperb!   For instance, after I got the base install done, I wanted to do two more things – Get XWindows up so I could have some GUI if and when I wanted it, and get my wireless card going.   Both of these processes were extreemly well documented and I got both accomplished with just the documentation on the ArchLinux site.   I highly recommend ArchLinux to anyone wanting to dig in deeper and learn more of what makes Linux tick by getting back to the basics and doing a more basic install and then building your system, the way you want it, from there.   ArchLinux——– A review of ArchLinux