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ArchLinux, when old becomes new again

There is an old saying about old things becoming new again.   That is what I thought about as I did an ArchLinux install for the first time this weekend.   The process took me way, way back into the ’90s when I first became involved with Linux.   Back then, it was Slackware and a pre version 1 kernel.   The process was boot from the disk and very carefully follow the directions.   No GUI install back then and you configured your system as you went.   When the install finished, you were were presented with a shell login prompt to logon as root.   Very much the same thing when doing an ArchLinux install today.   I chose to use the net install CD, which is only about 160MB in size, the rest of the distribution is pulled down from mirror sites on the Internet.   The main appeal, to me, was that it was a return to a more technical DIY type of install with every little detail under my control, as opposed to a GUI install that lets you choose the language, time zone and keyboard and all the rest is done for you.   Now, I am not at all complaining about the modern, easy, GUI Linux installs.   These are in fact WONDERFUL!   Without easy installs like these that very nearly garantee a successful install, Linux would have very little chance to spread and be as widely adopted as it is becoming.    However, sometimes us geeks need more.   We need to satisfy that urge to take a look under the hood and tinker.   Sometimes we just need to geek out and do it ‘the hard way’.   So, I jumped in and did an ArchLinux install to satisfy this need.   One thing that I found is that while is very much a lower level install, it is also a very structured and GOOD install process.   You encounter much more detail along the way, but the process is very tightly controlled.  It is also what I would consider a very educational install with the internals exposed to view.   However, one thing it is not is undocumented.   Back in the old days, the install was sparsely documented and you really had to hunt and search to find out what you need to know to get everything right and running.  The documentation on the ArchLinux site, and also provided on the install CD itself, is supperb!   For instance, after I got the base install done, I wanted to do two more things – Get XWindows up so I could have some GUI if and when I wanted it, and get my wireless card going.   Both of these processes were extreemly well documented and I got both accomplished with just the documentation on the ArchLinux site.   I highly recommend ArchLinux to anyone wanting to dig in deeper and learn more of what makes Linux tick by getting back to the basics and doing a more basic install and then building your system, the way you want it, from there.   ArchLinux——– A review of ArchLinux









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